"Imprinted In H!S Heart"♥...

People who have a religion should be glad, for not everyone has the gift of believing in heavenly things. You don’t necessarily even have to be afraid of punishment after death; purgatory, hell, and heaven are things that a lot of people can’t accept, but still a religion, it doesn’t matter which, keeps a person on the right path. It isn’t the fear of God but the upholding of one’s own honor and conscience. How noble and good everyone could be if, every evening before falling asleep, they were to recall to their minds the events of the while day and consider exactly what has been good and bad. Then, without realizing it you try to improve yourself at the start of each new day; of course, you achieve quite a lot in the course of time. Anyone can do this, it costs nothing and is certainly very helpful. Whoever doesn’t know it must learn and find by experience that: “A quiet conscience mades one strong!

— Anne Frank (via observando)


pbsthisdayinhistory:

August 1, 1944:  Anne Frank Writes Her Final Diary Entry
On this day in 1944, Jewish victim of the Holocaust, Anne Frank, wrote her final diary entry.  In it, she wrote, “[I] keep on trying to find a way of becoming what I would like to be, and what I could be, if…there weren’t any other people living in the world.” Her diary, later published under the title, Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl, detailed the two years that she and her family spent in hiding.
Three days after this entry, Anne and her family were arrested by the Gestapo, the German police. She was eventually placed in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, where she was killed by typhus at age 15.
Explore Frank’s writing in the Masterpiece film inspired by Frank’s life, The Diary of Anne Frank.
Photo: Anne’s diary on display at the Anne Frank Zentrum in Berlin, Germany. Wikimedia Commons View Larger

pbsthisdayinhistory:

August 1, 1944:  Anne Frank Writes Her Final Diary Entry

On this day in 1944, Jewish victim of the Holocaust, Anne Frank, wrote her final diary entry.  In it, she wrote, “[I] keep on trying to find a way of becoming what I would like to be, and what I could be, if…there weren’t any other people living in the world.” Her diary, later published under the title, Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl, detailed the two years that she and her family spent in hiding.

Three days after this entry, Anne and her family were arrested by the Gestapo, the German police. She was eventually placed in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, where she was killed by typhus at age 15.

Explore Frank’s writing in the Masterpiece film inspired by Frank’s life, The Diary of Anne Frank.

Photo: Anne’s diary on display at the Anne Frank Zentrum in Berlin, Germany. Wikimedia Commons


scrapes:

queermobile:

i want fourteen babies

i’m freaking out

(Source: internetexplorers)


portraitsofboston:

“Hey man, take my picture!”
“I can’t do it. It’s too dark.”
“Yeah, we need some light. Let’s go over there.”
“Are you homeless?”
“Yes, I am.”
“How long have you been homeless?”
“15 years. I’ve been in Boston 8 months. Before that I was in Washington, Virginia, New York, Philadelphia, Louisiana, Florida…”
“Why didn’t you stay in Florida? It’s so much warmer.”
“I wanted to see my family. But they don’t want to see me. They don’t understand depression. They treat me like dirt. Homeless people treat me better than my family.”
“And what happened 15 years ago? How did you end up on the streets?”
“I tried to burn myself twice. I had 30 surgeries. I was dead two times, but God brought me back. I don’t know why.”
“And why did you do it?”
“I was depressed. Why you crying?”
“Because you are a beautiful person, and my family is really messed up, and I’ve been very depressed. I think I can understand you.”
“Yes, I am a good person. And when you take people’s pictures, don’t disrespect them.”
“No, man, I won’t. I like people. That’s why I take their pictures.”
“And when you make your portfolio, don’t denigrate people. Let the pictures speak for themselves.”
“I will. Are you safe on the streets?”
“Yes, I am…And now I have $8 to buy me some food.”
“That’s all I have. Next time I see you, I will give you more.”
“No, man. It ain’t all about money. Give me a hug. And next time you see me, give me a hug again. And thanks for taking my picture.”
View Larger

portraitsofboston:

“Hey man, take my picture!”

“I can’t do it. It’s too dark.”

“Yeah, we need some light. Let’s go over there.”

“Are you homeless?”

“Yes, I am.”

“How long have you been homeless?”

“15 years. I’ve been in Boston 8 months. Before that I was in Washington, Virginia, New York, Philadelphia, Louisiana, Florida…”

“Why didn’t you stay in Florida? It’s so much warmer.”

“I wanted to see my family. But they don’t want to see me. They don’t understand depression. They treat me like dirt. Homeless people treat me better than my family.”

“And what happened 15 years ago? How did you end up on the streets?”

“I tried to burn myself twice. I had 30 surgeries. I was dead two times, but God brought me back. I don’t know why.”

“And why did you do it?”

“I was depressed. Why you crying?”

“Because you are a beautiful person, and my family is really messed up, and I’ve been very depressed. I think I can understand you.”

“Yes, I am a good person. And when you take people’s pictures, don’t disrespect them.”

“No, man, I won’t. I like people. That’s why I take their pictures.”

“And when you make your portfolio, don’t denigrate people. Let the pictures speak for themselves.”

“I will. Are you safe on the streets?”

“Yes, I am…And now I have $8 to buy me some food.”

“That’s all I have. Next time I see you, I will give you more.”

“No, man. It ain’t all about money. Give me a hug. And next time you see me, give me a hug again. And thanks for taking my picture.”

(Source: portraits-of-america)